About Don Iannone

Don Iannone is a poet and photographer in Greater Cleveland. He is currently working on his fifth poetry book. Don is the author of four earlier books of poetry (Stilling the Waters, Walks in Life's Sacred Garden, Chasing Cosmic Butterflies, and Poetic Reflections on Economic Development, and four books combining his poetry and photography (Winter Spirit, Spring Promises, Magical Light, and Speaking Out on the Unspeakable: Poems and Photographs about Human Trafficking). Don is also the editor of two books of poetry. The first is a collection of his father's poems When God Speaks to Us, and the second is a collection of poems written by mental health patients called Windows into Ourselves: Poetry on the Experience of Mental Illness. Don holds a Masters Degree in Consciousness Studies with a specialization in Mind-Body Medicine. He holds a Professional Diploma in Economic Development and a Bachelors Degree in Anthropology. Finally, he completed graduate studies in Organizational Behavior. Don is clinically certified as a Reiki Master Therapist, Meditation Guide, and Life Purpose Coach. He works with cancer patients at Cleveland Clinic as a complementary health therapist, where he is also involved in training other caregivers in healing practices, and conducts research on the use of these therapies in cancer care. Don worked in the economic development field for many years before his move into healthcare.

Equanimity

Are we so special
that the day should bow down to us,
and that we should look down upon
all that surrounds us?

Just for today,
I will honor all I encounter,
and I will try my best
to see the divine running through everything.

I will remind myself that life,
in all forms is special,
and that no form
is more special than any other.

Though blinded by my own eyes,
I will do my best today
to see myself in others,
and others in me.

the cancer bad dream

we want to be done with it,
before it’s done with us.

you reach a point,
even in the early stage,
where you want to believe
it’s just one big bad dream, and
hopefully you’ll awaken, and
you can return to your normal life–
the life you had before cancer.

but even if you’re lucky–
meaning your prognosis is very good–
you just want the bad dream to be over.