Life and Death: Two Sides of the Same Quantum Coin

Life and death–
Two sides of the same quantum coin.
Heads you win, tails you lose.
Call the flip.
Tails you win, heads you lose.
Call it again.

Life–
What our consciousness manifests
when we flip the coin.
Death–
What consciousness manifests
when we flip the coin.

Life and death–
Two sides of the same quantum coin.

Experiencing the Speed of Life

Pay attention to life’s details,
especially the infinitesimally small things
that bring you happiness and joy.
Marvel at how quickly each moment passes by
with each breath you take.
This is the speed of life.

Experience the surprise in everything.
Don’t prejudge what’s to come.
Notice how no two moments are the same,
like snowflakes or grains of sand.
This is you
An ever-changing wave of possibility.

Gratitude for the Rain

I am thankful for my life–
just the way it is.
It’s easy to forget–
life is one great miracle,
and each of us has had the chance
to experience life’s wonder and magic.

On this rainy Thursday morning,
I am grateful for the rain,
and how it nourishes and cleanses the earth.
Without it, there would be no flowers.
In a soulful way, the rain reminds us it is okay
for us to cry tears of joy and sorrow.

Because of the rain this morning,
I can see the world reflected
in a single raindrop dangling
from the screen in my front window.
In this moment, I give thanks for the rain,
and the blessings it brings to my life.

“Last Time” Awareness

The world looks different to us
with the awareness that
this may be the last time
we will ever see it again.

At these times,
goodbyes, no matter how grand,
appreciative, or reverent,
ring with lingering hollowness.

And memories, even the most precious,
become razor-sharp two-edged swords,
reminding us of what we will miss
and what we will never see again.

Even the deepest understanding
of reality’s impermanent nature
doesn’t prevent us from grasping at
what we love and what has given us pleasure.

A Prayer Honoring Our Wholeness

In this moment, I am whole.
All parts of me are working together
to promote healing and well-being.
My body receives wisdom from my mind and spirit.
My mind is given nourishing embodiment from my body
and life force energy from my spirit.
My spirit permeates all that I am,
and it is the source of all my future possibilities.
With each breath, I am connected to God.
I give thanks for this connection and my wholeness.

To Mary On Our Anniversary

Twenty-eight years ago on the twenty-fourth day of June,
we committed ourselves to a loving life together,
and off to France we flew for our honeymoon.

Our careers blossomed as our love grew–
Giving us the confidence
to our own souls be true.

Each home we’ve owned brought happiness and peace.
By our side, always kitties,
causing our love to increase.

To this day, I recall your ponytail bob,
as down the track you ran,
making my passion-struck heart throb.

Grateful we are for the people touching our lives–
Some over a lifetime, others just a moment.
Through all the ups and downs, our love survives.

With time we’ve matured, adding to our years.
The sparkle in our eyes still endures
through laughter, cheers, even some tears.

For each of us, I believe it’s fair say,
that the best in our lives has happened together–
Things we could never imagine have come our way.

I’d do it all over again…spend my life with you.
On this twenty-eighth wedding anniversary,
our soulful commitment and beautiful love renew.

What We Self-Reflect After Death

When we die, we become disembodied spirits.
And the only thing we self-reflect in this form
is the encoding our souls have retained from their past lives.

We don’t remember our bodies or personalities.
Not our life events, people we knew,
or even the places and times in which we lived.

It’s not until our souls are re-embodied
that we may form faint and fleeting recollections
of our earlier embodied forms.

That’s the way it’s supposed to be
so that it’s possible for our souls to evolve
toward their own Divine perfection.

Hard Things to Imagine

Hard to imagine
being dead,
since all we know
is being alive.

Hard to imagine
life after death,
since all we know
is being alive.

Hard to imagine
dreaming of things
beyond our experience,
but we do this every day.

Hard to imagine
when we’re dead and gone,
absent any reason to remember,
that our dreams will bring us back to life.

Coping with Our Fear

We can conquer our fear–
of cancer,
the pain it causes us,
and the prospect of death.

Our fear feeds our cancer–
making it grow larger than life.
Let’s make the choice
not to feed our cancer.

The starting point is
feeling our fear,
getting to know it,
then over time letting it go.

Cancer isn’t our fear.
Fear is what we experience
when we feel unprepared
to confront lingering uncertainty.

Reality is uncertain by nature.
Certainty is an illusion
that we hold onto
to stave off our deepest fears.

We have but this moment
at any point in our life.
Let’s work on living fearlessly,
breath by breath in each moment.

Thoughts on the Afterlife

Cancer reminds us of our mortality–
That is the time when we run out of time,
at least in our present form.

When our bodies die,
our cancer dies,
at least in its physical form.

Most of us,
including those with and without cancer,
believe that a part of us survives physical death.

I was raised to believe everyone has a soul,
which either goes to heaven or hell,
depending upon the good and bad in our life.

I still believe that everyone has a soul,
but instead of going to heaven or hell,
the soul returns to the ultimate life source.

Also I believe the soul has many lives–
which we don’t really remember, or only faintly recall,
as the soul moves from one life to another.

I don’t believe our personalities carry over.
Instead, I believe that our consciousness
and our basic spiritual pattern carries over.

Maximizing the use of our highest spiritual potential strikes me
as a good thing in this life and all future lives.
If we do that, we can’t lose!

Thoughts While Watering the Grass and Flowers This Morning

Cancer calls our attention to the small things in life,
like the simple beauty of watering the grass and flowers.
It reminds us of all the small things comprising our lives,
and why and how they are important to us.

It reminds us of the intricate details of life,
including the multitude of cells in our body,
and how misguided cells can grow and multiply,
creating malignant tumors in our body.

Cancer teaches us to constantly nourish ourselves,
like we weed and water the grass and flowers,
to bring about personal health and vitality,
and help the right things to flourish in our lives.

And when we are ready,
cancer can connect us to our inner wisdom–
those lessons our souls want us to learn
so they can reach their destinies.

Our Inner Wisdom Voices

Find your inner wisdom voice–
There lies your personal truth.
Listen past your fears–
They drown out what is true for you.
Look beyond your anger–
Which often is buried under your fear.
Set aside your desires and wants, and
listen to what your inner wisdom voice says
about what you need to become whole and heal.

Cancer Lesson: Empathy and Caring

Cancer can be a powerful teacher,
if we allow it to be.
One lesson it teaches:
Healing is a shared journey,
with those we love, and
with other cancer survivors.

When attacked, self-preservation is our first instinct.
That’s fine, as long as we also have empathy for others.
What we think and feel has everything to do
with what happens to our bodies.
A lack of caring for ourselves and others
is a spark lighting cancer fires.

Lighting a Prayer Candle

Our hearts are warmed when a far-off friend
expresses prayerful intentions for us
by lighting a candle in his parish,
symbolizing his prayer for our healing.

Each of us is a candle lit at birth by God.
And we grow in His favor
each time we use our candle to light others,
and dispel darkness in the world.

An Ode to Dr. Amit Goswami

Without his vision, I might not know
Our universe is self-aware,
Or that consciousness is the bridge
Connecting possibility and actuality.

He challenged me to observe my thoughts,
But also intently listen to what I feel.
A loving bulldog in every way,
His undying will to blaze and mark new trails.

In our comfort zones, most of us remain–
Places safe, little threat to who we are.
But that’s not the way
To be the change in the world of quantum reality.

Not many men of science are so bold
To risk major rejection and assault.
That’s why a loving spirit is required
To not take so personal vengeful attacks.

Once we gaze through the visionary window,
We see a world filled with quantum possibilities.
Why not converse with your soul,
And gain its wisdom on what the future holds.

Most of all, his work reminds me of
Our amazing powers of co-creation.
And through the eyes of our soul,
We give shape to our destiny.

Note: Dr. Amit Goswami, a theoretical physicist by training, is a former professor of mine who made the world of quantum physics accessible to me. Dr. G is one of the world’s leading authorities on the scientific, medical and spiritual implications of quantum physics. I continue to follow his groundbreaking work.

Life Questions

Let’s try our best not to make unwarranted assumptions in life–
They block our natural spiritual unfolding.
It’s far better to allow open questions to linger
Until they are ready to answer themselves.

Each of us is a living question, and
We remain alive as long as our question lingers.
Our questions ride the cosmic waves of quantum possibility
Until they take form as an answer, and then they cease to exist.

On the First Day of December

Six years ago,
On the first day of December,
My life flashed before my eyes
Like nothing I can remember.

Things I used to take for granted:
My work, the kids, and my wife,
And even smaller things like morning coffee,
Those things that make up ordinary life.

For months I ignored the dull aching pain,
Till it spread across my pelvis, ribs, and lower back.
And then gave way to such sheer agony,
I felt my body battered and under attack.

My doctor ran the usual tests.
All were normal, but for one.
My PSA was way too high.
More tests were ordered to be run.

Within days, the wellspring of my misery known:
Stage III prostate cancer, which had spread.
In a flash, radiation, surgery, hormone therapy.
Without of course, I’d be dead.

Since that time, a celebration of life is held,
Come rain or shine, each first day of December.
Each year, month, week, and day,
We dearly cherish and prayerfully remember.

Our Scars

Let’s be truthful about our scars in life,
And how we got them.
They’re not just about our injuries and pain–
Our scars reflect how we’ve lived our lives.

Sometimes we learn more from our scars
Than the stripes we wear on our sleeves,
Or all the awards we’ve won.
Let’s be truthful about our scars in life.

We are capable of healing,
But not always in the way we hope.
Healing deeply inside is most important–
These scars tell the real stories of our lives.
 

Soul-Searching

At times, we feel our impermanence–
The sense we will not exist forever.
These times call for soul-searching,
Which begins with searching for our souls–
Both in the light and darkness of our being.
And then, once we make the divine connection,
We commence searching within our souls–
For hints, clues, and hopefully unmistakeable answers
About who we are, and what becomes of us
When our souls decide to continue their journeys.

Learning a New Language

Each of us is unique, you know.
We live our lives, let them flow,
As though there is no tomorrow, and
Then our cancer tells us that isn’t so.

One thing you learn right away.
A new language is required to keep death at bay,
Which includes technical terms, Latin words and abbreviations.
Things you never imagine anyone would say.

Our doctors, nurses, and other caregivers
Never know exactly what cancer delivers,
And because their cancer language still doesn’t know
Life’s twisting, turning, overflowing rivers.

Berlitz can’t teach us to speak this tongue.
Requires a doctor, nurse, someone from a technical rung.
We cringe to words like malignant, spread and metastasis,
And words like benign and clear, Heaven’s praises sung.

For fear the language of cancer they may abuse,
Cure and healing, rare words that oncologists use.
Instead they dance, tiny delicate ballet steps.
Bolder terms about prognosis they refuse.

But late at night when I talk to God,
I spare no words in asking to be healed.
Anything else just a façade.
Bolder words I use as along the healing path I trod.

Jigsaw Puzzles in the Cancer Treatment Waiting Room

Jigsaw puzzles, missing pieces everywhere,
That patients, families, and friends share.
Some they finish, most they don’t,
Some too hard, so they won’t.

Oddly shaped interlocking and tessellating pieces.
Bit by bit, the perplexing mystery decreases.
Skilled puzzlers work first to build the frame,
While others treat all pieces just the same.

Some work the puzzles like their lives,
Trying this, trying that till an answer arrives.
While befuddled by the jigsaw puzzles,
Cancer causes them much bigger struggles.

For some, the puzzles distract them from their pain.
Others wonder about life on the celestial plane.
When finally the nurse calls their name,
In the waiting room, the jigsaw puzzles remain.